Modelling and control by Anthony Rossiter

MATLAB sisotool

 

MATLAB provides a number of tools to help users with the analysis of simple feedback loops. A key one amongst these is sisotool. This was updated substantially recently and thus these resources give a brief introduction to using the tool for a first course in classical control.

 

Users with older versions of MATLAB will find the some resources on this site linked to classical control design were compiled using the older version of sisotool.

The resources for new sisotool are listed below, beginning from a simple introduction tothe tool and going through to using the tool for compensator design.

  1. sisotool with Matlab 2016 - an introduction.
  2. sisotool with Matlab 2016 - overlaying plots.
  3. sisotool with Matlab 2016 - proportional design.
  4. sisotool with Matlab 2016 - lag compensator design.

sisotool with Matlab 2016 - an introduction

Introduces the main screen lay out and options in sisotool. Shows how to obtain plots that are not present automatically such as input responses and Nyquist diagrams. Also shows where some embeded structural assumptions are accessed.

sisotool with Matlab 2016 - overlaying alternative compensators

A key task is to to compare and contrast different compensators. This resource shows how the new version of sisotool stores compensators and allows the user to overlay Bode, Nyquist and step responses for each of comparison.

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sisotool with Matlab 2016 - proportional design

Students normally beginning control design looking solely at proportional compensation. This resource shows how the drag facility in sisotool allows for easy tuning of a proportional, to at least get in the right range and using intuitive graphical based design approaches. Also shows how the compensator editor allows fine tuning if required.

sisotool with Matlab 2016 - lag compensator design

sisotool has excellent functionality for entering and displaying compensator poles and zeros. This video shows how the drag and drop functions allow a quick graphical based design, without recourse to number crunching, which give a lag compensator close to an equivalent which would require detailed algebra and computation.

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